A Thought Experiment - XIII:

Divergence and convergence in mandalic geometry:

1- A change of heart 

 

image

(continued from here)

Before proceeding to a description of the composite two-dimensional geometry stage I think it proper even at this early “linear” stage to say a few words about divergence* and convergence* as general organizing principles and about their importance to mandalic geometry. This part of the story touches necessarily upon the quite closely related concepts of white holes and black holes.

I know I stated that my purpose in creating this blog was to separate the geometric aspects from the physical aspects of blindmen6.tumblr.com but truth be told I’ve found it impossible to do so fully. I think once we admit time to the mix, and mandalic geometry is very much a geometry of time as well as of space, it becomes a question of how does one divorce pattern from process.

The answer is: it can’t be done. At least not completely. When the process (time-related) aspects of mandalic geometry are removed what remains is dead (functionless) pattern. I envisage mandalic geometry as imbued with a kind of life of its own which involves the full unification of structure and function. I do not aspire to a lifeless geometry.

(to be continued)

Image: A 2D vector field pointing inward. By Duane Q. Nykamp. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

 

*See for example here (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8) to start.

© 2014 Martin Hauser

dimensao7:

Quantum Physics

(via tomisontheinternet)

A Thought Experiment - XII:

Dimensions of  potentiality and actuality

 

image

(continued from here)

The three dimensions of Cartesian 3D coordinate space which we perceive as our ordinary everyday dimensions are for mandalic geometry composite (or diploid*) dimensions whereas the two extra dimensions of which each is the resultant are singular (or haploid*) dimensions.

The composite dimensions, from our limited human point of view, can be considered “dimensions of actuality”; the singular extraordinary dimensions can be considered “dimensions of potentiality”.** The geometry based upon this supposition postulates the interchangeability of these different varieties of dimension. Mandalic geometry should be viewed as a geometry of spacetime, which is to say one of time as well as of space, and as such is in continual flux.

If this postulate is accepted one consequence of it is that each of the sixty-four hexagrams describes a potential set of circumstances.*** The Cartesian “equivalent” of a hexagram is a point in ordinary 3-dimensional space. As such it does not represent the actualization of all possiblilities inherent in the hexagram but is simply our limited way of viewing space and is a degenerate form**** of the total information contained in the hexagram and its relationships with all other hexagrams or points in the   higher, more comprehensive 6-dimensional space.

Cartesian space is, simply put, a degenerate space actualized in a manner our minds are best able to view and comprehend real potential space of higher dimensions. The process of actualization necessarily always involves the giving up of some potentiality. Such is the human condition and the way of the natural world.

(to be continued)

 

*to borrow a term from the science of genetics.

**This is, in fact, quite analogous to the situation in reproductive biology existing between the number of sets of chromosomes in diploid cells (zygotes and body cells) and haploid cells (germ cells or gametes). Read all about ploidy here. This is, I think, not simply an interesting aside and coincidence. It points to how nature in managing its economy tends to make use of similar patterns of structure and function at very different operational scales.      

"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication."

                               - Leonardo da Vinci

 ***This is consistent with the manner in which the I Ching has been viewed and used in traditional Chinese culture for hundreds, possibly even thousands of years.

****Degeneracy in mathematics refers to a special case derived from some more general case and lacking one or more of the potencies present in the original.

In mathematics, a degenerate case is a limiting case in which an element of a class of objects is qualitatively different from the rest of the class and hence belongs to another, usually simpler, class. Degeneracy is the condition of being a degenerate case.

A degenerate case thus has special features, which depart from the properties that are generic in the wider class, and which would be lost under an appropriate small perturbation. [Wikipedia]

See also article on Degenerate energy levels with reference to quantum states.

© 2014 Martin Hauser

thenewenlightenmentage:

New ‘switch’ could power quantum computing
Using a laser to place individual rubidium atoms near the surface of a lattice of light, scientists at MIT and Harvard University have developed a new method for connecting particles—one that could help in the development of powerful quantum computing systems.
The new technique, described in a paper published today in the journal Nature, allows researchers to couple a lone atom of rubidium, a metal, with a single photon, or light particle. This allows both the atom and photon to switch the quantum state of the other particle, providing a mechanism through which quantum-level computing operations could take place.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

New ‘switch’ could power quantum computing

Using a laser to place individual rubidium atoms near the surface of a lattice of light, scientists at MIT and Harvard University have developed a new method for connecting particles—one that could help in the development of powerful quantum computing systems.

The new technique, described in a paper published today in the journal Nature, allows researchers to couple a lone atom of rubidium, a metal, with a single photon, or light particle. This allows both the atom and photon to switch the quantum state of the other particle, providing a mechanism through which quantum-level computing operations could take place.

Continue Reading

(via theguybehindthescreenphd)

A Thought Experiment - XI:

Not just for Flatlanders

 

image

(continued from here)

The geometry of one composite dimension is in one sense built from the bigrams. Its four component points (three in ordinary 1-dimensional space) indeed look exactly like the bigrams. There is, however, at least one important difference. The bigrams as shown heretofore refer only to the four quadrants of the xy-plane in Cartesian geometry. The points of all the dimension-composite planes (xy, xz and yz) require an enhanced notation derived from the hexagram notation for consistency and clarity. The significant idea here is that the context of a bigram determines its unique signature. More on this presently.*

It is important to understand that as used above the bigrams refer only to the x-axis, not to the xy-plane. The second (upper) line here is not a y-axis coordinate but rather a second x-axis coordinate in a new kind of geometry derived from composite dimensions. At this point it would be a good idea to review the differences between the real number line and the mandalic number line.

The simple rule for translating the composite coordinates of mandalic geometry into the ordinary coordinates of Cartesian plane geometry is to add the two composite coordinates and divide by 2. This operation will yield one of only three possible results: +1, -1, or 0. The two bigrams that share the zero coordinate of Cartesian space both yield Cartesian x=0 when the stated operation is performed upon them.

Note that this mechanism obviates any need for the vacuous zero of Western mathematics, replacing it with the fully functional and capacious “zero” of Taoist notation. Although the two alternate forms of “zero” here are necessarily shown side by side it should be understood that they are in actuality superpositions of one another at the origin and may be properly shown with either to the right of the other.

(to be continued)

 

*For the time being, for simplicity and preciseness in introduction of the subject we will continue to use the bigram notation as before, here in reference to the x-axis rather than the xy-plane. We will not need to use the enhanced bigram notation until we arrive at the description of the geometry of two composite dimensions to follow in subsequent posts.

Nevertheless it would be good to keep in mind that every point in mandalic space consists of three ordinary dimensions determined by six extraordinary dimensions and therefore every point requires a six-line designation for full characterization.

Ergo, the four higher dimension points shown in the diagram above if placed in context of three ordinary (or six extraordinary) dimensions would require six lines for unique delineation and appear as hexagrams. Moreover, the bigrams shown refer to the xy-plane and are derived from the first and fourth lines of the hexagram, not from the first and second lines as might be initially intuitively thought proper.

The short explanation for this is that hexagrams are composed of two trigrams, an upper trigram and a lower trigram Each trigram is composed of three lines referring to three dimensions of space, the first to the x-axis dimension, the second to the y-axis dimension and the third to the z-axis dimension. Therefore the two x-axis coordinates of mandalic geometry notation come from the first (lowest) line of the lower trigram and the first (lowest) line of the upper trigram (or put another way as we have, from the first and fourth lines of the hexagram.)

 

© 2014 Martin Hauser

A Thought Experiment - X:

An introduction to composite dimension

 

(continued from here)

Tennieldumdee

Let’s admit from the outset that no one knows what a dimension really is. It has been defined in a number of different ways with various intents and with somewhat limited success. For mandalic geometry dimension has to do with the ways in which parts relate to wholes and to one another at the Planck scale. Which is to say mandalic geometry views dimension as related to combinatorial capacity of quantum entities* and as well to the associated symmetries and asymmetries so engendered.**

So we are free to treat dimension differently than in the strict manner in which Descartes treats it in his coordinate system and geometry. For the purposes of mandalic geometry we will consider dimensions as viewed in our 3-dimensional perception as being composites of two or more higher dimensions which always occur together in our perception of reality.*** In the 6-dimensional geometry developed from the I Ching each of the ordinary three dimensions of space is a composite resulting from explicit interaction of two higher dimensions.

(to be continued)

Image: John Tenniel (1, 2) illustration of Tweedledum (centre) and Tweedledee (right) and Alice (left). [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

*And in some manner to quantum numbers and the ways in which they relate to one another.

**The view here is one of dimension as a relational network.

In physics and philosophy, a relational theory is a framework to understand reality or a physical system in such a way that the positions and other properties of objects are only meaningful relative to other objects. In a relational spacetime theory, space does not exist unless there are objects in it; nor does time exist without events. [Wikipedia]

See also Combinatorics and Boolean lattice.

***A more general notion of composite perception has been advanced by some who suggest that there is evidence that the brain in some ways operates on a slight “delay”, to allow nerve impulses from distant parts of the body to be integrated into simultaneous signals.

© 2014 Martin Hauser  

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.
The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.
In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

Source: goo.gl

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.

In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

Source: goo.gl

(via gravel88)